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What is the difference between an acquired brain injury and a traumatic brain injury?

What is the difference between an acquired brain injury and a traumatic brain injury?

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain caused by an external force after birth. Common causes of a traumatic brain injury include gunshot wounds, motor vehicle crashes, assaults, or falling and striking your head.

An acquired brain injury (ABI) includes all types of traumatic brain injuries and also brain injuries caused after birth by cerebral vascular accidents (commonly known as stroke), and loss of oxygen to the brain (hypoxic brain injury).

Injuries to the brain that are present at birth or progressive in nature, such as Alzheimers disease or Parkinson's are not considered a traumatic or acquired brain injury.

The official definitions of these terms as adopted by the Brain Injury Association are below.

Traumatic Brain Injury
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is defined as an alteration in brain function, or other evidence of brain pathology, caused by an external force.

Acquired Brain Injury
An acquired brain injury is an injury to the brain, which is not hereditary, congenital, degenerative, or induced by birth trauma. An acquired brain injury is an injury to the brain that has occurred after birth. 


 
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