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Are the Orientation Log and Cognitive Log valid screening measure of thinking skills?

Categories: Cognitive Assessments - Thinking and Emotional Skills

The Question

Are the Orientation Log and Cognitive Log valid screening measure of thinking skills?

Early Studies

Early Studies: The Orientation Log and Cognitive Log were developed to provide a quick, bedside measure of thinking skills to track recovery following TBI. These scales are reliable and are predictive of performance on extended assessment of thinking skills and recovery at one year after injury. A comparison of the Orientation Log and Cognitive Log to an established screening measure of thinking skills is needed to further confirm the validity of these scales.

This Study

This study included 45 people receiving acute rehabilitation (68% of the them TBI cases). The Orientation Log involves questions on location, time (such as date, day of week), and awareness of why a person is receiving treatment. The Cognitive Log has questions focusing on concentration and memory abilities. Both of these scales can be given at bedside and take a few minutes. The subjects in the study were administered these tests, as well as the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), an established screening test of thinking skills. The MMSE score correlated significantly with the Orientation Log and Cognitive Log. This means that the Orientation Log and Cognitive Log can be used with confidence as general brief measures of thinking ability

Who May Be Affected By These Findings

People with traumatic brain injury, care providers in acute rehabilitation.

Caveats

Having a brief measure of thinking skills is not a replacement for a more detailed testing of cognitive skills, such as in a neuropsychological evaluation.

Bottom Line

The Orientation Log and Cognitive Log can be used to briefly assess cognitive skills at bedside.

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Find This Study

Penna S, Novack T. Further validation of the Orientation and Cognitive Logs relative to the Mini Mental Status Exam. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 2007; 88: 1360-1361.

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