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Keep On, Keeping On!

March 3, 2021 Meredith Murray
Keep On, Keeping On!

So, here’s my story in a nutshell…
On June 20, 1995, I was the driver in a near-fatal car accident. Apparently I lost control of my car, or maybe fell asleep at the wheel…I still have no idea how it happened.
Nevertheless, I flew 50 feet out of my vehicles’ back window, as my brand new Ford Escort, flipped down the freeway embankment.
My lifeless body was found, by a truck driver who just happened to witness my accident and was kind enough to call 911 and pull over to help me.
Luckily, he knew a way to find my body, which was far away from my totaled car, in the darkness of the night. AND, he just happened to know CPR!
Synchronicity??
This stranger, breathed for me & kept my heart beating, until I was life-flighted to the nearest trauma hospital. I flatlined 3 times on the way there. Then, I spent 4 days in a coma.
When I “woke up,” I was very confused about where I was & why I was there; since I had NO memory of my accident.
I was eventually transferred to San Diego Rehab Institute (SDRI) & started my frustratingly slow, daily rehab therapies. I began to realize all of the changes in my cognition, compared to my prior abilities.
Since that life-changing day, 20+ years ago, I’ve had a TON of rehab/therapies & have learned many strategies & resources for living a fulfilling, productive life, in spite of my new deficits. I wasn’t able to go back to my former job, teaching preschool. I had to find a totally different career! I decided I wanted to work with & help other, adult brain injury survivors & their loved one’s. I’ve worked for several different residential & outpatient, TBI rehab facilities.
I believe it is my “calling” or “purpose,” to be a cheerleader to other resilient, “differently-abled,” Brain Injury warriors & to provide them with HOPE & helpful resources!

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